CMPA Guidance & Resources

Overview

Various associations provide in-depth guidance on reducing the risk of cows’ milk protein allergy. Key aspects are picked out below. However, you may wish to read expanded guidelines within their full context.

Cows Milk Protein Allergy Guidance Resources
EAACI Food allergy and anaphylaxis Guidelines (2014)1

"If breastfeeding is insufficient or not possible for the first 4 months, infants at high risk can be recommended a hypoallergenic formula with documented preventive effect for the first 4 months of life."

Access the full guidelines

 

American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Report (2008)2

"Atopic dermatitis may be delayed or prevented by the use of extensively or partially hydrolyzed formulas, compared with cows’ milk formula, in early childhood."

  Access the full report

 

The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) 19993

"If exclusive breastfeeding is not possible, it is recommended that a hypoallergenic formula (with a confirmed reduced allergenicity in adequate clinical studies) should be used."

  Access the full statement

 

British Dietetic Association consensus statement (update note 2014)4

"Recommended alternatives to breast milk are partially or extensively hydrolysed formula milks, with infants at highest risk being given extensively hydrolysed casein milk. These hydrolysed formulae should be used for 4–6 months or until the time that cow’s milk in any form has been introduced into the infant’s diet. "

Access the full statement

 

References Show all Hide all
  1. European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Guidelines (2014). Available at http://www.eaaci.org/foodallergyandanaphylaxisguidelines/Food%20Allergy… accessed November 2018.

  2. Greer F et al (2008). Effects of Early Nutritional Interventions on the Development of Atopic Disease in Infants and Children: The Role of Maternal Dietary Restriction, Breastfeeding, Timing of Introduction of Complementary Foods, and Hydrolyzed Formulas. Pediatrics volume 121; (1):183-191.

  3. Host A, Koletzko B, Dreborg S, et l. Joint Statement of the European Society for Paediatric Allergology and Clinical Immunology (ESPACI) Committee on Hypoallergenic Formulas and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition. Dietary products used in infants for treatment and prevention of food allergy. Arch Dis Child. 1999;81:80–84

  4. British Dietetc Association (2014). Update Note: Practical Dietary Prevention Strategies for Infants at Risk of Developing Allergic Diseases. Available at https://www.bda.uk.com/publications/professional/faisg_update_april_2014 accessed November 2018.

Important Notice:

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has recommended that pregnant women and new mothers be informed on the benefits and superiority of breastfeeding – in particular the fact that it provides the best nutrition and protection from illness for babies. Mothers should be given guidance on the preparation for, and maintenance of, lactation, with special emphasis on the importance of a well-balanced diet both during pregnancy and after delivery. Unnecessary introduction of partial bottle-feeding or other foods and drinks should be discouraged since it will have a negative effect on breastfeeding. Similarly, mothers should be warned of the difficulty of reversing a decision not to breastfeed. Before advising a mother to use an infant formula, she should be advised of the social and financial implications of her decision: for example, if a baby is exclusively bottle-fed, more than one can (400 g) per week will be needed, so the family circumstances and costs should be kept in mind. Mothers should be reminded that breast milk is not only the best, but also the most economical food for babies. If a decision to use an infant formula is taken, it is important to give instructions on correct preparation methods, emphasising that unboiled water, unsterilised bottles or incorrect dilution can all lead to illness.

Cows Milk Protein Allergy Guidance Resources

CMPA Guidance & Resources

Overview

Various associations provide in-depth guidance on reducing the risk of cows’ milk protein allergy. Key aspects are picked out below. However, you may wish to read expanded guidelines within their full context.

EAACI Food allergy and anaphylaxis Guidelines (2014)1

"If breastfeeding is insufficient or not possible for the first 4 months, infants at high risk can be recommended a hypoallergenic formula with documented preventive effect for the first 4 months of life."

Access the full guidelines

 

American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Report (2008)2

"Atopic dermatitis may be delayed or prevented by the use of extensively or partially hydrolyzed formulas, compared with cows’ milk formula, in early childhood."

  Access the full report

 

The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) 19993

"If exclusive breastfeeding is not possible, it is recommended that a hypoallergenic formula (with a confirmed reduced allergenicity in adequate clinical studies) should be used."

  Access the full statement

 

British Dietetic Association consensus statement (update note 2014)4

"Recommended alternatives to breast milk are partially or extensively hydrolysed formula milks, with infants at highest risk being given extensively hydrolysed casein milk. These hydrolysed formulae should be used for 4–6 months or until the time that cow’s milk in any form has been introduced into the infant’s diet. "

Access the full statement

 

References Show all Hide all
  1. European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Guidelines (2014). Available at http://www.eaaci.org/foodallergyandanaphylaxisguidelines/Food%20Allergy… accessed November 2018.

  2. Greer F et al (2008). Effects of Early Nutritional Interventions on the Development of Atopic Disease in Infants and Children: The Role of Maternal Dietary Restriction, Breastfeeding, Timing of Introduction of Complementary Foods, and Hydrolyzed Formulas. Pediatrics volume 121; (1):183-191.

  3. Host A, Koletzko B, Dreborg S, et l. Joint Statement of the European Society for Paediatric Allergology and Clinical Immunology (ESPACI) Committee on Hypoallergenic Formulas and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition. Dietary products used in infants for treatment and prevention of food allergy. Arch Dis Child. 1999;81:80–84

  4. British Dietetc Association (2014). Update Note: Practical Dietary Prevention Strategies for Infants at Risk of Developing Allergic Diseases. Available at https://www.bda.uk.com/publications/professional/faisg_update_april_2014 accessed November 2018.